• Unlike most of the motoring public, truckers are subject to annual, federally-mandated urinalysis drug testing; this is also applicable as a result of a fatality accident. When you hear of a drug-addled trucker on the news, it’s because it’s news, as in it doesn’t happen very often compared to the rest of the public.

 

  • Truckers are also subject to a bi-annual physical exam as a condition of keeping their licenses. We are not talking about merely looking into some scope and reading the last line for the doctor: this is a full medical exam, conducted by a doctor certified by the FMCSA.

 

  • Average car drivers can log around 15,000 to 20,000 miles per year. In that same time the average trucker has put down 100,000 to 120,000 miles. They do it all in weather conditions which sideline other drivers, and in vehicles which can weigh up to 80,000 pounds (or even more with proper permits). In the face of this fact, the old charge about truckers being incompetent often falls flat, for it is they who get all this practice. Even police rarely drive this much.

 

  • Most truckers who drive long routes do not sleep in motels. There’s still a lot of people who believe this. Those who live on the highway literally carry our bedrooms with them in that large are behind the driver’s seat, appropriately called the sleeper.

 

  • Eating out on the road can become very expensive. It can cost up to $200-$300 per week to feed his face. This is why having a refrigerator or, at least, a high quality cooler is key.

 

  • Many truckers prefer to drive at night to avoid traffic and things that can slow their progress.

 

  • A long-haul driver doesn’t have this set schedule like everyone else: when he eats, sleeps, gets breakfast, and everything else largely depends on when the freight is due at its destination. This means that his entire schedule can flip between loads; his days is now his night and vice versa. Your circadian rhythm can be destroyed in this job.